Simple Jam Recipe

Feijoa, Fig, Berries... you can use any fruit with this easy recipe

Figs & Feijoas

Figs and Feijoas are abundant at the moment, but because their season don’t last long, it’s a really good time to stock the freezer with flavours for Winter, or make some jam. To freeze figs, just cut them in half lengthwise and freeze in bags in cupfuls. To freeze feijoas, just cut them in half, scoop out the flesh straight into a one cup measure then pop into freezer bags.

Measure the fruit by single cup, two cups or three cups into a bag, write the contents on the bag to make life easier later, then freeze. Figs (add some ginger, and the juice of a lemon) and feijoas make great jam, here’s a simple (reduced sugar) recipe for most fruit.

Method

1. For every 3 cups of fruit, combine with 2 cups of sugar in a saucepan and mash to mix the fruit and sugar. The more you mash, the smoother the jam - cut the figs finely if you find it easier. You can add more sugar as you like up to a 50/50 mix, but test as you go it’s easier to add than remove. Put a small plate in the freezer when you start cooking the jam. 

2. Heat gently until boiling, stir occasionally to prevent sticking and skim off any foam that forms. After about 20 minutes the jam should be thickening nicely. 
If you don’t have a sugar thermometer, put a dollop of the jam on the small plate from the freezer and pop back into the freezer for a couple of minutes, taking the jam off the heat while you wait.

3. Remove the plate and push your finger through the jam, if there is a skin on the jam that wrinkles when pushed, it’s done. If not, just boil it a bit longer and re-test every 3 minutes or so. 

4.  Once cooked, ladle the hot (be very careful and use a funnel if you have one) jam into sterilised jars (wash jars and lids in hot water, rinse and place in oven on a tray at 160°C for ten minutes), pop on the lids and tighten. Rinse the outside of the jars and label once cooled. Store in a cool place for up to six months. Discard any jam that develops mould at, just as you would store-bought jam.